The Status of Dialogue Journal Writing as a Methodology for the Literacy and Language

Development of African American Students

 

Ingrid Haynes-Mays, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

haynesmaysi@tsu.edu

Bernnell Peltier-Glaze, Ed.D.

Assistant Professor

Department of Educational Administration and Foundations

glazebm@tsu.edu

 

Shanna Broussard, Ph.D.

Interim Department Chair/Associate Professor

Department of Counselor Education

broussard_sl@tsu.edu

 

Biographical Sketch: Ingrid Haynes-Mays is currently an Associate Professor in Department of Curriculum and Instruction for Texas Southern University.  Dr. Haynes-Mays received her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction with emphasis in TESOL for the University of Mississippi, her Masters of Education in Reading from Texas Southern University and her Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education from Texas Southern University.  Dr. Haynes-Mays’ research interests include areas related to literacy and language development.  She has presented and published numerous articles on the above topics.   She has also  co-authored  the book entitled ” A Recipe for Hands-On  Activities for teaching Phonemic Awareness in the Primary Grades” – a wonderful book that provides teachers and parents with activities  for improving phonemic awareness and phonics.  Research Interests: Literacy and Language Development

 

Biographical Sketch: In the K-12 system, Dr. Peltier-Glaze served as a classroom teacher, mentor teacher, supervising teacher, administrative intern/assistant principal/administrator, principal, director and trainer. She has been responsible for professional development for teachers and principals. She is a certified teacher and administrator and also does educational consulting. She has presented at several local, state and national conferences.  She has presented at several local, state and national conferences. Her publications include “The Role of the Principal in Teacher Retention” in Texas Study of Secondary Education.

Research Interests:  Leadership in Urban Education, Ethics in Education

 

 

Biographical Sketch: Shanna Broussard is currently serving in the capacity as the Interim Department Chair in the Department of Counselor Education. Dr. Broussard received her Ph.D. in Rehabilitation from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. She has been a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor since 2002. Dr. Broussard’s research interests include cultural diversity, equitable services for individuals with disabilities, and educational equity. She has presented and published several articles related to her research interests. Dr. Broussard is also co-author of the book Cultural and Educational Excellence Revisited: Knowing, Doing, Being, and Becoming as though Saving the African American Child Matters.

Research Interests:  Cultural Diversity and Educational Equity

Abstract

Employing the notion that many students who speak African American Vernacular

English (AAVE) often are leaning English as a second language, the researchers wanted to

implement an ELL technique which allows students to practice writing and improve their writing

skills in a nonthreatening manner. Increasingly, dialogue journaling is a literacy strategy that is

being used in classroom settings at all instructional levels for a variety of purposes. Studies done

in the area of composition support the notion that free writing activities help to develop

confidence and efficiency among first language (L1) and second language (L2) students (Peyton,

2000). Dialogue-journal writing provides students with the opportunity to explore and

experiment with language.

Haynes-Mays, Ingrid Ph.D.; Peltier-Glaze, Bernell M. Ph.D.; and Broussard, Shanna L. Ph.D. (2011)

“The Status of Dialogue Journal Writing as a Methodology for the Literacy and Language Development of African American Students,” ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy: Vol. 1: Iss. 1, Article 3.

Available at: http://ecipublications.org/ijlsp/vol1/iss1/3

My Baby’s Daddy…

Posted: December 9, 2010 in Uncategorized

My Baby’s Daddy: Understanding the World of Teen Dads

Joyce Finch, Ed.D.
Assistant Professor

College of Education/Counseling
finchjg@tsu.edu

Biographical Sketch:  Dr. Joyce Finch is an assistant professor in the counseling department, and her speciality is school counseling. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Houston, masters from Sam Houston State University, and her doctorate from Texas Southern University. Dr. Finch was aa elementary and middle school teacher for nine years, intermediate school counselor for 10 years, and a high school counselor for 13 years. She provides reviews for  the TExES Competency Exam for masters students majoring in school counseling.
Research Interests: 
Teen Mothers and Teen Fathers

                                          
Abstract
Most of the research has focused primarily on teen mothers while ignoring and neglecing teen dads. This population has been portrayed negatively and not given much consideration. Several teen dads were interviewed, and they discussed their circumstances and pressures to meet familial, social, and economic responsibilities. The teen dads also discussed ways they can be helped which will enable them to graduate from high school, become successful in life, and become actively involved with their child.

Research concerning teen parenting had mainly concentrated on teen mothers while neglecing and negatively portraying teen fathers. Many studies only included the teen mother’s perspective of the father of her baby, which relied on her patiality regarding his role and involvement (Reeves, 2007). Teen fathers were percieved as “no good, love-’em-and-leave-’em bad boys who use the girls for sex and then want nothing to do with them or their kids after” (Wilder, 2008). Many times teen dads did not have a say in what happened with their baby and were often shunned by the mother of their baby’s family (Wilder, 2008). When the baby’s mother’s family disapproved of the teen dad and wanted the teen mother to distance herself from the baby’s dad, they were discouraging an otherwise interested father from having a relationship with his child and the mother of his baby (Weiman, Agurcia, Rickert, Berenson, & Volk, 2006). “People perceive teen dads as not interested, and the culture is not to ask for this sort of advice to help. A lot of it is cultural, why we don’t work more with young men. This is changing” (Simpson, 2008).

In recent years more studies have been conducted concernng teen dads, and it has been discovered that teen dads ae taking more responsibility (Wilder, 2008). In fact, teen dads who do try to “step up to the plate” are dropping out of high school to find work and are unfortunately working minimum wage jobs because they have no skills or higher educaion (Simpson, 2008).

The population for the investigation will consisted of all the available teen fathers who attend high school in three suburban public high schools in the southeastern region of the United States. Directe interviews were conducted, and the researcher continued interviewing until se was not getting any new information.

After several teen fathers were interviewed, it was discovered that those teen fathers who had the support of their baby’s mother’s family were actively involved with their child. If the family of the teen mother discouraged any relationship with the teen dad, he was not very involved and sometimes not involved at all.

Teen dads expressed that they had needs just like their baby’s mother. Parenting classes would tremendously benefit them as well as resources to help them find employment. All the dads interviewed wanted a relationship with their child and were not upset about giving financial support to their child.

References:

Reeves, J. (2007, August). ‘Tell me your story': Applied ethics in narrative research with young fathers. Children’s Geographics, 5, 253-265.

Simpson, K. (2008, Septemer 21). Teen dads often cropped out of picture. The Denver Post.

Weimann, C. M., Agurcia, C. A., Rickert, U. I., Berenson, A. B., & Volk, R. J. (2006, December). Absent fathers as providers: Race/ethnic differences in support for adolescent mothers. Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, 23, 617-634.

Wilder, K. 92008, October 6). Daddy grows up….fast. Retrieved February 21, 2010 from
     http://blogs.marinij.com/kawilder/2008/10/teen_dads.html

 

PSYCHOLOGICAL VARIABLES IMPACT THE ACADEMIC   

PERFORMANCE OF AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDENT ATHLETES

 

Lacey Reynolds, Ed.D.

Assistant Professor

Department of Health and Kinesiology

reynolds_lm@tsu.edu

 

Biographical Sketch:  Dr. Lacy Reynolds has 34 years of professional experience of which 33 years have been in higher education at various universities.  Dr. Reynolds received the Rebound by Award Life Share Bllod Center Appreciation Award by M.D. Anderson for Blood Drive and the Academic Achievement Award from Grambling State University. 

Research Interests:  Reading and Researching Academic Performance and Obesity in the African American Community

 

Abstract

Too often African American student athletes attempt to mimic people who are their sports heroes. Yet, history has shown that through their resilience, African American athletes can make the adjustments to become successful in arenas other than sports. Research by Synder (1996) and later Farmer (1994) both contend that African American student athletes have false fantasies: false athletic dreams and overwhelming ambitions about using basketball as a springboard to becoming rich and famous.

 

The Purpose of this study was to examine the linear relationship of selected psychological, variable to the academic performance of NCAA Division I basketball players. A major focus of this study is to ascertain relevant data comparative to basketball players’ views such as their motivation toward sports, academics, and their overall attitudes or self-esteem. After all, the NCAA’s academic enhancement programs were implemented to put strong emphases on student-athletes’ graduation rates and to make strong accountability measures by which colleges and universities must abide and, which include college administrators, coaches, parents, and student-athletes themselves. Therefore, based upon the changes implemented in NCAA rules, in accountability measures and the increase of student-athletes attending college each year, particularly at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), there exist a need to study the relationship between the educational attainment levels of various student-athletes and their related psychological factors.

 

This article was published in the Journal of Research Association for Minority Professors November Volume of 2009.

The Intervention Handbook

Posted: December 9, 2010 in Uncategorized

The Intervention Handbook. The National Literacy Professional Development Consortium (NLPDC). [2011]

 

Shanna Broussard, Ph.D.

Interim Department Chair/Associate Professor

Department of Counselor Education

broussard_sl@tsu.edu

 

Ingrid Haynes-Mays, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

haynesmaysi@tsu.edu

 

Hope Luster, Ed.D.

Educator/Klein ISD

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

hluster@kleinisd.net

 

Biographical Sketch: Shanna Broussard is currently serving in the capacity as the Interim Department Chair in the Department of Counselor Education. Dr. Broussard received her Ph.D. in Rehabilitation from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. She has been a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor since 2002. Dr. Broussard’s research interests include cultural diversity, equitable services for individuals with disabilities, and educational equity. She has presented and published several articles related to her research interests. Dr. Broussard is also co-author of the book Cultural and Educational Excellence Revisited: Knowing, Doing, Being, and Becoming as though Saving the African American Child Matters.

Research Interests:  Cultural Diversity and Educational Equity

 

 

 

Biographical Sketch: Ingrid Haynes-Mays is currently an Associate Professor in Department of Curriculum and Instruction for Texas Southern University.  Dr. Haynes-Mays received her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction with emphasis in TESOL for the University of Mississippi, her Masters of Education in Reading from Texas Southern University and her Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education from Texas Southern University.  Dr. Haynes-Mays’ research interests include areas related to literacy and language development.  She has presented and published numerous articles on the above topics.   She has also  co-authored  the book entitled ” A Recipe for Hands-On  Activities for teaching Phonemic Awareness in the Primary Grades” – a wonderful book that provides teachers and parents with activities  for improving phonemic awareness and phonics.  Research Interests: Literacy and Language Development

 

Abstract

 

This handbook is a guide to help provide teachers with strategies and interventions. The implementation of activities and strategies associated with Response to Intervention (RtI) is expected to have a positive effect on schools across the state. RtI may be described as a model addressing the needs of all students through a continuum of services which provide:  (1) high-quality instruction and scientific, researched-based, tiered intervention strategies aligned with individual student need;  (2) frequent monitoring of student progress to make results-based academic or behavioral decisions; (3) data-based school improvement; and  (4) the application of student response data to important educational decisions (such as those regarding placement, intervention, curriculum, and instructional goals and methodologies).

Education Is a Civil Right…

Posted: November 14, 2010 in Uncategorized
 

“Education Is a Civil Right: Reflecting, Refocusing and  Revitalizing Our Commitment to the Whole Child”

 Research Institute

Friday, March 25, 2011

James A, Johnson, Jr., Ph.D., Convener

Texas Southern University

The Premier College of Education

Houston, Texas

J. R. Cummings, Ph.D., Dean

 Texas Alliance of Black School Educators

26th Annual Conference

March 24-27, 2011

Dallas, TX

Dr. Elaine Bailey, President

 

Measuring and Evaluating the Funding Gap of Historically Black Colleges and Universities: The Impact of Federal Funding on HBCUs

Amber M. Adams

Texas Southern University

Houston, Texas

The Author

Ms. Amber Adams obtained her undergraduate degree from TSU in the field of Business Administration with an emphasis in General Management and Finance. As a result of her engagement in several research projects and upon graduation, she was accepted into the Master of Public Administration degree program at the Barbara Jordan and Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs. In her first year, she was involved in three policy studies ranging from Homeland Security to federal immigration issues.  In her final year in the MPA Degree Program, she interned with the NASA University Research Center (URC) was a part of the first space flight experiment opportunity for T SU.  Her background is in information technology, quantitative financial analysis, managerial, and decision policy. She also has extensive knowledge of time series studies, management, and Public Administration.

She matriculated in the Ed.D Degree Program at TSU.  Since her high school days, she developed a strong connection and commitment to the youth in the inner city.  Serving as a Mentor and Mediator, a strong desire and commitment was made to devote her professional career and personal calling, working with students. 

The Abstract

In March 2009, President Obama’s education budget caused a stir when it did not include the $85 million funds that had been appropriated to federally recognized Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) since 2007. For years, HBCUs have struggled with financial difficulties and stressed budgets as they attempt to compete with their counterparts that include state colleges and universities, private schools, religious affiliated colleges, liberal arts colleges, community colleges, and for-profit institutions. With the recent economic downfall that has plagued the nation since 2008, many HBCU leaders say, “they can’t afford the cuts to direct funding” (bet.com), which were imposed by the Obama Administration. White House officials responded stating the new budget will provide $7.9 million in programs that will “strengthen predominately Black institutions, expand the Pell Grant award to $5,550, and ensure the reliability of financial aid”. The administration has invested $850 million into HBCUs over the next 10 years.


 Certified does not mean Qualified!

West Brook High School’s Plan of Action for Raising Minority Students’ Mathematic Academic Achievement

Wilbert J. Andrews Jr.

Beaumont Independent School District

Beaumont, Texas

 

The Author

Mr. Andrews was born in Beaumont, Texas.  He resides in Beaumont Texas, and is a member of West Brook High Schools graduating class of 1988.  Mr. Andrews graduated from Lamar University in August 1995 with a B.A.A.S (Major Health Education / Minor Mathematics).  He received his Master of Education degree from Prairie View A&M University in 2005. He is currently enrolled at Texas Southern University in the doctorial program.

Mr. Andrews taught at Edison Middle School (PAISD) for 3 years (7th and 8th grade mathematics); Ozen High School (BISD) for 7 years (Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II); and is currently an Assistant Principal at West Brook High School (Mathematics Supervisor). Mr. Andrews was the mathematics department chair at Ozen High School from 2004-2007.

Mr. Andrews was the Beaumont A&M teacher of the year 2006-2007. He was the region V high school assistant principal of the year 2010.

 The Abstract

The school system is faced with a problem that has been persisting for quite a while. Principals are facing the shortage of available certified and qualified teachers. Principals are having a hard time finding qualified personnel to educate students, and even more finding teachers that can relate to the various cultural backgrounds that students bring to the learning arena. They are faced with the options of hiring who they can find, or leaving teaching positions vacant. Often principals hire anyone certified or posses a probationary certification to fill the teaching vacancies. Just because a teacher is certified does not mean that they are qualified!

The saying, “You have to work with what you have”, comes to mind when I think of the personnel problems faced by principals in public education. The purpose of this action research is to offer some possible strategies that may be used to address the personnel problems faced by principals. Specifically, this action research addresses the instructional strategies exercised by teachers’ of different cultural backgrounds from their students at West Brook High School. Administration at West Brook High School has provided a variety of strategies for the staff development of their teachers, thus these strategies were used to meet minority students at their ability levels to assure academic success.

Trifecta CIPP Report

The Authors


Wilbert Andrews

Beaumont Independent School District

Beaumont, Texas

 

Mr. Andrews earned a B.A.A.S  from Lamar University in 1995 and a Master of Education degree from Prairie View A&M University in 2005. He   taught 7th and 8th grade mathematics, Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II, and served as mathematics department chair  for three years.   He currently serves as an Assistant Principal at West Brook High School and Mathematics Supervisor and has been the Beaumont A&M and Region V high school assistant principal of the year.

The Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to share the process and results of a CIPP Evaluation of a Middle School in a Public School District in Southeast Texas.  The focus of concern was to  identify possible causes and solutions to the low

Dana Lewis

Beaumont Independent School District

Beaumont, Texas

Dana L. Lewis received her undergraduate degree from Lamar University, and a MS from Prairie View A & M University.  She  began her career as a Secondary English Language Arts and Reading teacher and taught 9th grade English Language Arts for 4 years.  She now serves as a middle school assistant principal.  Ms. Lewis has been a TxBess mentor, a mentor to Region V teachers, and presented at new teacher orientations for the Beaumont school district. 

Math TAKS test results for 6th graders.  When compared to 6thgrade TAKS test results in other subject areas, the Math scores were considerably lower.  This paper provides the method and sources utilized to gather data and

Gatsy A. Moye’

Beaumont Independent School District

Beaumont, Texas

 

Ms.  Moye’s began her public education in LeChester, England. She  earned a BBA at Lamar University; Vocational Certification at SWTSU; and a M.S., Education Administration from Prairie View A&M University.  She has served as a teacher,  Business Education Co-op Coordinator,  Administrative Assistant, and Assistant Principal. She is a member of numerous professional and civic organizations and recipient of several awards, information, the means by which the information was evaluated, the strategies  recommended based on the evaluation of the data, and outcomes and achievements resulting from the implementation of the recommendations.


The effects of teachers using the Chemistry Interim Assessments in Houston Independent School District to prepare for the End of Course Exam


Takisha Bolden

Texas Southern University

Houston, Texas

The Author

Takisha Bolden is a graduate of Baylor University with a B.A. in Biochemistry, and from Texas Woman’s University with a master’s in business administration. In 2007 she began her career in education as a chemistry teacher at Wheatley High School. In 2010, she became a Science Instructional Coordinator at Worthing High School. Currently, she is working as a Secondary Science Instructional Specialist in the curriculum department, in which she supports eight schools.  In addition to her work schedule and goals, she is a student in the Texas Southern University Premier College of Education, where she is  pursuing a Doctor  of Education degree in Curriculum and Instruction.

 The Abstract

The Houston Independent School District curriculum, instruction and assessment department created Interim Assessments. These Interim Assessments are based on the new statewide science TEKS, that focuses on the new End of Course exam for chemistry. To better prepare students and teachers for the new upcoming EOC test, the curriculum department has prepared assessments that measures students success based on the learning focus. The learning focus is a point in the district Horizontal Alignment Pacing Guide (HAPG), that teachers follow and pace their instruction within a specified time. Each test focuses on specific topics from the learning focuses. This paper looks at the purpose and critical points of the interim assessments and their affects of implementation through high school chemistry teachers.


 Action Research Proposal: Houston Community College Student Achievement 

Kennetra A. Bryant

Houston Community College

 The Author

Kennetra A. Bryant is the second oldest child of four children, and the daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Bryant Sr. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Music, specializing in Piano, with a minor in Business Administration and a Masters in Education Curriculum & Instruction, both from Texas Southern University. She has had the opportunity of serving as tutorial instructor, music teacher, proctor, legal assistant & an associate teacher.  Currently Ms. Bryant is a Guided Studies Professor within the Houston Community College System. As she works diligently on furthering her education she has aspirations to make a difference in the lives of future students.  One of her future goals includes becoming a Professor at a University, preferably a Historically Black College or University.

 The Abstract

Houston Community College offers a wide range of developmental Guided studies courses for students who have not passed or have not received high scores on the required state college entrance exams.   These courses prepare students for college level critical thinking, analyzing, and college readiness techniques that will help guide them in becoming proficient students and competent professionals in any career that they have chosen.  The following action research proposal within this paper suggests that there are probable causes to why students entering college are not performing to the guidelines of specified state college exams and College standards and the reasons that there are gaps in student achievement. Further research is necessary to establish the causes of student achievement in and outside the classroom.

Action Research Report, Music Curriculum Implementation

Ava Hogan-Chapman

Texas Southern University

Houston, Texas

The Author

A native of New Orleans, Louisiana, Mrs. Ava Hogan-Chapman was born to the late Moses and Gloria T. Hogan on January 8, 1973.  She received Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education from Dillard University in 1995.  In 2008, she received her Master of Arts in Educational Leadership from Prairie View A&M University.  Mrs. Hogan-Chapman is currently pursuing her Ed.D in Curriculum and Instruction from Texas Southern University. She is certified in Elementary Education 1-8, Special Education EC-12, and the Principleship. Mrs. Hogan-Chapman is the proud mother of three, (Marlon Jr., Monet, and Micah) and the wife of Marlon Chapman Sr. She is a devoted Christian and active member in the worship, music and arts ministry of Crossover Bible Fellowship Church in Houston, Texas.

 Abstract

This action research identified two flaws with the implementation of a music curriculum.  Teachers were not using the internet nor lesson plans for student learning.  Action research discovered the reasons for poor implementation. Specific questions regarding these identified curriculum components were asked of the teachers in an anonymous Likert scale survey to determine the specific causes for the lapse of curriculum implementation in these specific areas.  The results of the survey were not significantly varied but did indicate that there was a systematic breakdown in the area of fundamental necessities for proper curriculum implementation.  Further professional development opportunities and training for teachers were found to be necessary for the future success of the music curriculum implementation.


 

Just like Mommy and Daddy: What Educators See is the

Program You May Get


The Authors

Deirdre Davenport

Beaumont Independent School District

Beaumont, Texas

Deirdre Davenport has been a secondary science educator for twenty-five years in the Beaumont Independent School District. She also serves as a chemistry teacher, science coach and medical magnet coach/ liaison. She received her bachelor’s degree from Lamar University and a master’s degree from Prairie View A&M University. 

James A. Johnson, Jr., PhD

Texas Southern University

Houston, Texas

 Dr.  Johnson has an undergraduate degree from the City University of New York, a MS from Nova University, and a Ph.D. from the University of California.  He has been a Professor of Education and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in TSU’s Premier College of Education since 2002. 

Charisma Popillion


Beaumont Independent School District

Beaumont, Texas

Charisma Popillion received her B.S. in Interdisciplinary Studies from Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas in 2003 and  her Masters of Educational Leadership from Lamar University in 2007.   Charisma also earned an English as a Second Language Certification She has taught 6th and 8th grade students and in the TAKS Recapture Program.

The Abstract

This paper focuses on two forms of racial discrimination: the over and under representation of learners of African descent in special education and gifted and talented school programs. We approach this focus by demonstrating these disproportionalities in the Nation, in the State of Texas, and in Texas’ twenty Educational Regions.  We then explore the utilization of a theory of intergenerational transmission of beliefs, values, attitudes, paradigms, behavior, and consequences as an explanation for these disproportionalties.  Finally, we report outcomes of an exploratory study of relationships between the location of parents of African descent on a cultural identity continuum and the placement of their children in Special Education and Gifted and Talented school Programs.


Action Research: Enrollment Management

Mazie Senegal McCoy

St. Mary of the Purification Catholic School

Houston, Texas

The Author

Mazie Senegal McCoy is a native Houstonian. She is a devoted wife and loving mother of twelve years old twin boys. Mazie earned a Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies from Sam Houston State University, a Masters of Science in Administration and Supervision from the University of Houston, Victoria and is currently pursuing doctoral studies in Curriculum and Instruction from Texas Southern University.  She  taught for eleven years in grades first through fourth and currently serves as the principal of a Catholic elementary school in inner city Houston. Mazie takes great pride in serving on the Archdiocesan of Galveston -Houston’s School Council in which she has specific duties in creating policy. She’s especially grateful for the opportunity she has to shape the future.

 

The Abstract

St. Mary of the Purification Catholic School is an Inner-City school located in the Third Ward of Houston, Texas. The school was founded in 1930. It closed in 1960 when Texas Southern University opened and the demographics of the neighborhood changed. St. Mary’s School reopened in 1980 as a Montessori school with the help of the Dominican Sisters. I have served as principal of St. Mary’s School since 2003. We’ve noticed a decline in enrollment. The number of Catholic students we’re servicing is also decreasing. More and more families are requesting financial assistance. Thus, I’ve initiated an Enrollment Management Plan on my campus adopted from a plan used in the Diocese of Arlington, Texas, which proved to be successful there. It was inspired by seminars offered by educator John Cooper of the Institute of School and Parish Development.  The first step was to create an Enrollment Management Team to focus on the specific situation and goals of the school. The team consists of ten people including eight parents, one teacher and myself. “The purpose of the Enrollment Management Team is to establish enrollment goals and develop systematic procedures for reaching the enrollment objectives (Diocese of Arlington, 2009)”. The end result will be the development of a comprehensive promotion and communications plan consistent with the school’s mission, data and resources. The team meets once a month and works on assignments between meetings.